CTNG – Coffee The New Godzilla

Posted in acronyms, coffee

Caffeine – you catch it, you can’t get rid of it, it kills you.

OITA – Or Is That Absurd

That’s pretty much the concept of catching human IV, you catch it, you can’t get rid of it, it stays with you for life, and kills you unless now you TAKE/DRUGS that make stockholders in companies rich, and taxpayers poor. They keep claiming you can’t catch/release.

For example, that keyboard in your hand, you catch it and can’t get rid of it. You have it for life.

So today we read a headline about a H who didn’t release the caffeine and died. He had “too much caffeine”. They of course blame the caffeine and all reports on it blame the caffeine because one H blamed the caffeine. The H I am referring to is the “coroner”. He or she made the official declaration that it was the caffeine that killed.

When did caffeine become a killer like HIV?

Google News page snapshot from 5/17/2017 at 7:35 am pt showing snippet from Buzz Feed

Scientists, doctors, coroners, reporters and you can learn a lot from this new killer.

As with the fantasy called HIV there is no such thing as one killer that enters the body and kills you, as if that was true, everyone who tested positive for caffeine would be dead. Well we all die so maybe it is from the caffeine. It eventually gets you.

Or, it’s a combination of things.

What gets me is how the masses believe what coroner’s say is true “It was the caffeine that did it”.

Looking into this situation further we see that the teen who died went to the hospital because he had felt light headed and weak.

Light headed and weak is not a disease.

The hospital treated him.

See spot run away from treats.

Hospitals give out too many.

We should ask exactly how he was treated.

What did they pump into him?

Notice how coroners never say “The hospital killed them”?

Maybe it was the treat meant.

Had he just stayed home he probably would be drinking coffee today.

feature image of coffee and spoon by Julius Schorzman (Own work) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons